Author Topic: Cycling infrastructure built to encourage commuting by bike?? Crazy talk!!  (Read 8505 times)

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shovelhd

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I don't either.

Offline WCroadie

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We are smarter than the midwesterners, obviously.  :P
WC is the Debil.

RUOkie

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We are smarter than the midwesterners, obviously.  :P
So I must be smarter because I'm FROM the Northeast?  I wash my face as well :P

shovelhd

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Didn't you learn to wash your hands in med school?  :P

rog

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I've looked at those before, can you reuse them?  Being a thrifty shopper, I can get 180 baby wipes for less than $2.  Been using them for summers of commuting so far, no issues.  But I'd be willing to give action wipes a try.

Go look at the repurposing section. You can buy some of the stuff that's on the action wipes in a spray can, wash the wipes, spray some more stuff on them and they're good to go. Plus, the woman who runs this business is an awesome person.

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Offline LAJ

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Go look at the repurposing section. You can buy some of the stuff that's on the action wipes in a spray can, wash the wipes, spray some more stuff on them and they're good to go. Plus, the woman who runs this business is an awesome person.

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What Rog says, and what I have echoed many times.

They will never be as cheap as an/a ass baby wipe, but you will be addicted to them once you use them. A fresh clean smell that is tough to beat.
Always be careful of the zealot.  Most zealots are hiding something

rog

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What Rog says, and what I have echoed many times.

They will never be as cheap as an/a ass baby wipe, but you will be addicted to them once you use them. A fresh clean smell that is tough to beat.

Plus, the aloe in there is very soothing if you get a little sunburned.

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Offline globecanvas

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For work I've recently been to London, Paris, and Berlin.  Each city has a municipal bikeshare system. 

The London and Paris systems are similar:  many rental racks throughout the city, where you grab a bike, and return it to any rack.  In practice the Paris system is more user friendly IMO, because it seems like there are many more racks (one every couple of blocks sometimes), each rack has a map of other racks (handy when you come across an empty rack, which only happened to me once), and the checkout system is simpler.  The Paris bikes are more solid, but on the other hand the Paris system is much more heavily used, so the bikes get more abuse.  Paris also gives you credit for dropping off a bike at the top of a hill, which is cool.  (London and Berlin don't have hills.)  The Paris system feels like it was designed for usability, whereas the London system feels like it was designed as a marketing plan.

The Berlin system is completely different: you can pick up or drop off bikes anywhere.  A smartphone app tells you where all the nearby bikes are.  When you find a bike, the app gives you a code to unlock it.  It's a far cleverer design, but in practice it's much less usable.  It makes a big difference that you never just stumble across a rack and think "hey, I could be biking now."  You have to apply more intention to the process, which reduces the convenience.

The real test of all the systems is how well they work when you stumble out of a bar and want to ride back to your hotel.  Paris wins that contest, hands down.  The NYC system looks like it is modeled after London, which isn't surprising.